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Newsletter No. 2/2019: Immigration from within the European Union
Dear Reader,
 
                                                                    

Welcome to this new issue of the Make it in Germany newsletter. Keep up to date with the key developments in the field of immigration of skilled workers and integration in Germany. Your Make it in Germany team wish you an enjoyable read!
This edition contains:  
  • In the spotlight: Immigration from EU Member States
  • Figure of the month: The European elections in Germany
  • Updates on Make it in Germany:
    • Join now! Make it in Germany – user survey 2019
    • Information summaries in Korean
    • Checklists for immigrants preparing their move to Germany
  • Guest article : Introducing the Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers

In the spotlight

Immigration from EU Member States 

Large numbers of people from other regions of the world would like to live in Germany for many different reasons. The latest data from the central register of foreign nationals (AZR)[1] shows that the migration flows to Germany are closely linked to the principle of free movement which applies within the European Union (EU).

Germany is the most popular EU destination for migrants

According to Eurostat estimates, some 4.4 million people migrated to an EU Member State in 2017. During the same period, some 3.1 million people emigrated from an EU country. Germany received the largest number of immigrants (917,000)[2]. This makes Germany the most popular destination for migrants among the EU Member States. The UK is in second place, followed by Spain and France. The figures include migrants from other EU Member States, people from outside the EU, EU citizens returning to the EU, and stateless persons. The figures on migration within the EU are similar. The Federal Office for Migration and Refugees reports that almost 635,000 EU citizens moved to Germany in 2017.[3] This makes Germany the most popular destination, also for immigrants from other EU Member States.
EU citizens in Germany

At present, Germany is home to around 4.8 million people from other EU countries[4]. Among them, Polish nationals make up the largest group (881,591), followed by Romanians (670,234), Italians (649,875), Croatians (382,983), and Greeks (364,528).  

The most recent developments show that the trend is continuing, with a total of 316,600 non-German EU citizens registering their move to Germany in the first semester of 2018[5]. This figure represents an increase of 3% over the same period in the preceding year. Romanians make up the largest group of immigrants from the EU, with 102,352 people registered. The table below shows that they are also the group to have seen the strongest growth in recent years. The second-largest group are people from Poland (58,571 persons), followed by Bulgarians (32,797 persons), Croatians (24,231), and Italians (21,723).

Working in Germany as an EU citizen

Unlike nationals from non-EU member states, EU citizens enjoy freedom of movement. This means that they are free to take up work in Germany without any restrictions (Section 2(2) Freedom of Movement Act/EU). Under the principle of freedom of movement there are no more border controls at most national borders within the EU. EU citizens do not require a visa to travel to Germany and take up residence in the country. 
Once they have been in the country for three months, however, they must prove that they are either working or seeking work, or that they have sufficient financial resources in order to be able to afford a living in Germany (e.g. because they receive a pension from another EU Member State). For those who are involuntarily out of work, freedom of movement applies for a period of 6 months, affording EU citizens and their family members leave to remain in Germany (Section 2(3) Freedom of Movement Act/EU).

Support services: The EURES network

The European Employment Services is a network dedicated to the task of promoting freedom of movement in actual practice. The EURES website provides jobseekers from all EU Member States with detailed information about life and work in other EU countries. Employers can also use the website to set up their own profile and advertise their vacancies across Europe. Jobseekers can search the EURES database for jobs in all of the countries of the EEA and/or file their CVs. The EURES network is thus designed to facilitate cross-border application and matching processes on the European labour market.

Figure of the month

Germans will go to the polls for the European election on 26 May 2019. Some 3.9 million non-German EU citizens living in Germany are also entitled to vote in the country (Federal Election Commissioner, 2019).



Updates on Make it in Germany


Join the Make it in Germany’s user survey 2019!  

Do you have suggestions for the website Make it in Germany? Please join our recent online survey. Completing the survey will only take a maximum of 5 minutes and your responses will help us develop the website further. Your opinion is important to us! To the survey

Information summaries in Korean

Did you know that citizens of the Republic of Korea do not need a visa to travel to Germany? This piece of information and a lot more about careers, work and studies in Germany is now available in a condensed Korean-language version. Follow the link to the Korean website.

Checklists for immigrants preparing their move to Germany

The Make it in Germany checklists make it easier to keep track of the various important steps to be taken in preparation of the move to Germany. The checklists are aimed at skilled professionals, students and trainees from within and without the European Union. Download the checklists here.

Guest article 

Introducing the Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers

“Freedom of movement for employees and fair working and living conditions are essential fundamental rights bestowed on EU citizens! – Across the entire European Union,”, says Minister of State Annette Widmann-Mauz, Federal Government Commissioner for Migration, Refugees, and Integration.

The Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers, which was set up in 2016 in line with EU Directive 2014/54 and is attached to the office of the Federal Government’s Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration (which is based at the Federal Chancellery), is tasked with making this a reality. The Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers aims to improve the overall framework that allows EU employees to exercise their rights. In its work, the office caters to EU citizens in Germany and their families living here and to experts providing support services to them within existing structures. The Office’s website is available in eleven languages and contains information, tips and detailed overviews on residency law, German work culture, the German education system, welfare services, and a guide to German public authorities, which makes it easier to navigate the German public administration.

A dedicated search engine for finding an advice centre, which takes the form of an interactive map of Germany, makes it possible to find advisory services close to your home, depending on what languages you speak and what type of support you require. In addition to this, EU citizens and staff of dedicated support centres also have the option to turn directly to the Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers.

The Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers wants to enforce the EU fundamental right to free movement and make fair living and labour conditions a reality in Germany.

Contact: 

To learn more about the work of the Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers, visit www.eu-gleichbehandlungsstelle.de or contact us at:

Office for the Equal Treatment of EU Workers
Task Force for the Commissioner for Migration, Refugees and Integration
Federal Chancellery

Postal address: 11012 Berlin
Street address: Kapelle-Ufer 2, 10117 Berlin

Email: info@eu-gleichbehandlungsstelle.de 



Sources: 

[1]The central register of foreign nationals (AZR) is one of the largest automated registers used by the German public administration. It is a database containing data on foreign nationals living in Germany for a period of move than 90 days.

[2] Reference: Eurostat, March 2019: https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/pdfscache/1275.pdf 

[3] BAMF (2019): Monitoring freedom of movement – Migration of EU citizens to Germany – Annual Report for 2017: http://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Publikationen/Broschueren/freizuegigkeitsmonitoring-jahresbericht-2017.pdf?__blob=publicationFile 

[4] Current as of 30 June 2018; Reference: central register of foreign nationals (AZR) as cited in: Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, 2019: Monitoring freedom of movement. Migration of EU citizens to Germany – Report for the first semester of 2018, http://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Publikationen/Broschueren/freizuegigkeitsmonitoring-halbjahresbericht-2018.html;jsessionid=711127F52778F9985771657EDD9EBD75.2_cid359?nn=11263428 

[5] Statistics taken from the central register of foreign nationals (AZR) as cited in: Federal Office for Migration and Refugees, 2019: Monitoring freedom of movement. Migration of EU citizens to Germany – Report for the first semester of 2018, http://www.bamf.de/SharedDocs/Anlagen/DE/Publikationen/Broschueren/freizuegigkeitsmonitoring-halbjahresbericht-2018.html;jsessionid=711127F52778F9985771657EDD9EBD75.2_cid359?nn=11263428 


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On behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi)